Originally published in 1901 when Schweitzer was a young man, the book established his reputation as … It is admitted in the foreword of the version I got that it was scanned by OCR software, and it is quite evident that absolutely no editing was done; furthermore, the type is smaller than most people are accustomed to. Just a moment while we sign you in to your Goodreads account. Interesting book, but I may have had too high of hopes for it. What I got out of my reading is that some choose to add to (or embellish) the story of Jesus, while others choose to take away (or diminish) aspects of the gospel accounts. The quest of the historical Jesus was originally the quest after ‘the Jesus of Nazareth who. Ev angelical Perspective. I took a very long time with this book as it sat beside my bed buried deep within my oft battery drained nook. To calculate the overall star rating and percentage breakdown by star, we don’t use a simple average. He tells them not to lose their belief, but to find in the words of Jesus a reason to continue believing. “The demands of Jesus are difficult because they require us to do something extraordinary. It is worth saying that the original English translation does Schweitzer no favours. Extremely informative, well-researched, and dry as a desert after a ten-year drought. The editor of the new edition criticizes the first English translation and says much of the original text is newly translated. The Jesus Quest. Then, by the next paragraph we're already treating these new postulates as axiomatic for our continued embellishments of theory. Well, the date of publication was 1910, so most of the histories of Jesus were nineteenth century German histories. The further I read into this book the more I enjoyed Schweitzer's writing style. However, I found this 'quest' to really come on strong in it's later chapters, when the author reveals the eschatalogical nature of Jesus's agenda to initiate the end of times with his parousia. There are no discussion topics on this book yet. Schweitzer concludes, “The Jesus of Nazareth who came forward publicly as the Messiah, who preached the ethic of the Kingdom of God, who founded the Kingdom of Heaven upon earth, and died to give His work its final consecration, never had any existence.” Published in 1911, this book is critically out-of-date with modern scholarship regarding the bible and Christianity. Largely yes, this stunning theory is unveiled at the end of the book only after the cataloguing of all German thought on the life of Jesus for the better part of two centuries during which the critical method evolved and then flourished. It is HIS version of Jesus. To see what your friends thought of this book, In the 18th and 19th centuries, European academics not only tried to flesh out the historical Jesus, they also attempted to make sense of the Gospels as documents that at some level described natural events. The famed humanitarian, theologian, and philosopher presents a chronicle of unbelief as he reviews the history of apostate German theology and philosophy that denied the resurrection of Christ or even that He existed at all. One by one, he tears each portrait from the wall. Most significantly, it describes the presuppositions each philosopher/theologian began with which shaped his/her study and analysis. Schweitzer cuts a swathe through more than fifty authors and their ideas. The first quest was undertaken by rationalistic skeptics who sought to separate the religious dogma that surrounded Jesus from his historical exploits. Reviewed in the United States on May 24, 2020. Read the "First Complete Edition" English 2001. Still something pushed me to the end persisting throughout the deep weeds of German theology. You can thank the author's infatuation with his own writing for the endlessly long-winded and sentimental sentences. Schweitzer discusses numerous retellings of the life of Jesus, written by German theologians, over the course of about 200 years. I didn't really have that from reading it. He introduces each author and their attempt at writing about a historical Jesus. Schweitzer cuts a swathe through more than fifty authors and their ideas. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Moving from Paulus who first denies all miracles and the supernatural as Schweitzer claims he goes through all of the major theologians and philosophers who denied the Bible and Christ and yet led universities that drew fundamentalists like R.A. Torrey to study in them. What I got out of my reading is that some choose to add to (or embellish) the story of Jesus, while others choose to take away (or diminish) aspects of the gospel accounts. I buy numerous Kindle versions for the same reason. The sidelights on Hegel, Strauss, Feuerbach and Nietzsche make this almost as interesting about the 19th Century as about the 1st. We’d love your help. BEST OF THE BEST - MONUMENTAL -Greatest Jesus Book EVER! His own theories, though written just over a century ago, are remarkably current, with the exceptions that the Dead Sea Scrolls and the Nag Hammadi materials had not yet been discovered when. This book is essentially a historiography of the Jesus question, and introduced one of the most enduring questions in Jesus research: was Jesus eschatologically minded? Translated by W. Montgomery. I feel blessed to have been able to embrace Holy Tradition late in life, and through that tradition we see the Jesus Christ we need to embrace this Holy One and the life He offers. I read this book almost 20 years ago but recently purchased a digital copy because I wanted to have it available for ready reference; that is how important it has been over the years to my personal spiritual journey. He then tears apart each argument in turn, while cherry-picking those ideas that agree with his own ideas. Albert the Alsatian looked very similar to that other Albert, the Einstein. Very important new material is Schweitzer's discussion of a raft of recent books by scholars like J. M. Robertson and Arthur Drews denying the existence of Jesus. Schweitzer's knowledge of those who came before him in this field is impressive. New research on the Dead Sea Scrolls and other Jewish and Hellenistic texts has resulted in a surge of new images of Jesus and new ideas about his ministry. The damage that German theology did to nominal Christianity and worshipers of scholarship is immeasurable. Schweitzer's 'Quest' is an authoritative journey through European eighteenth, nineteenth and early twentieth century studies on the historical Jesus. Reviewed in the United States on June 2, 2015. The Quest of the Historical Jesus: A Critical Study of its Progress from Reimarus to Wrede. It gave me an in depth looks at the roots of the scholarship in the books I have been reading lately. This volume had been sitting around on the shelves for years, but only read years after the completion of seminary. This book is essential reading for anyone seeking to understand the issues of the historical Jesus arising from the gospels, which issues are many and substantial. But Schweitzer writes with enough wit and candor to make it worthwhile. Worth the read to the student of the history of Biblical interpretation. Very important new material is Schweitzer's discussion of a raft of recent books by scholars like J. M. Robertson and Arthur Drews denying the existence of Jesus. “He comes to us as One unknown, without a name, as of old, by the lakeside, God's Problem & The Problem of Pain Bibliographies, Karen M. McManus Delves into Dark Family Legacies with 'The Cousins'. This pioneering research was inspired by. He was born in Kaisersberg in Alsace-Lorraine, a Germanophone region which the German Empire returned to France after World War I. Schweitzer challenged both the secular view of historical Jesus current at his time and the traditional Christian view, depicting a Jesus who expected the imminent end of the. He does not merely break them in half, he destroys them utterly. In the end, Schweitzer concludes that viewing Jesus as an apocalypticist is the best way to reconcile the varying portrayals of him in the gospels. If you are into that kind of writing, it is a pretty good book. Albert Schweitzer, M.D., OM, was an Alsatian theologian, musician, philosopher, and physician. I do not believe this book is for the casual reader; it requires real effort and considerable time to read--an effort hindered (at least in the book I received from Amazon), by very poor formatting. His own theories, though written just over a century ago, are remarkably current, with the exceptions that the Dead Sea Scrolls and the Nag Hammadi materials had not yet been discovered when he wrote.

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